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Colorado Springs, CO | 719-227-1950

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Q & A

Chiropractic - What is it?

Chiropractic is a health care discipline and profession that emphasizes diagnosis, treatment and prevention of mechanical disorders of the musculoskeletal system, especially the spine, under the hypothesis that these disorders affect general health via the nervous system. It is generally categorized as complementary and alternative medicine, a characterization that many chiropractors reject.

 

Although chiropractors have many attributes of primary care providers, chiropractic has more of the attributes of a medical specialty like dentistry or podiatry. The main chiropractic treatment technique involves manual therapy, including manipulation of the spine, other joints, and soft tissues; treatment also includes exercises and health and lifestyle counseling. Traditional chiropractic assumes that a vertebral subluxation or spinal joint dysfunction interferes with the body's function and its innate intelligence, a vitalistic notion that brings ridicule from mainstream science and medicine.

 

Chiropractor in Colorado Springs

Dr. Scott Cathey is a certified chiropractic physician in Colorado Springs. He has dedicated his career to helping patients with auto accident injuries, neck pain, low back pain, sports injuries, hip pain, joint pain. Dr. Cathey is active in the Colorado Springs community and enjoyes the outdoors. His passion is helping his patients enjoy life in a healthy way. Cathey Chiropractic offers chiropractic treatments as well as wellness programs to fit your lifestyle.

A woman who is feeling good

Vertebral subluxation

Vertebral subluxation is a term that is used by chiropractors to describe signs and symptoms of the spinal column. Chiropractors also add a visceral component to the definition. Chiropractors maintain that a vertebral subluxation complex is a dysfunctional biomechanical spinal segment (lesion) the same as medical doctors do, but additionally assert that the dysfunction actively alters neurological function, which in turn, is believed to lead to neuromusculoskeletal and visceral disorders.

 

The WHO acknowledges this difference between the medical and chiropractic definitions of a subluxation. Medical doctors only refer to "significant structural displacements" as subluxations, whereas chiropractors suggest that a dysfunctional segment, whether displaced significantly or not, should be referred to as a subluxation.[1] This difference has been noted in the proceedings of the Mercy Center Consensus Conference: "The chiropractic profession refers to this concept as a "subluxation". This use of the word subluxation should not be confused with the term's precise anatomic usage which considers only the anatomical relationships."[2]

 

The chiropractic vertebral subluxation complex has been a source of controversy since its inception in 1895 due to its metaphysical origins and claims of far reaching effects on health and disease. Although research into the significance of the chiropractic vertebral subluxation is still ongoing, it has critics and supporters both inside and outside the profession.

 

Although some in the chiropractic profession reject the concept of subluxation and shun the use of this term as a diagnosis,[3] its current and officially accepted status by the profession has been repeatedly confirmed: In 1996 a consensus definition of subluxation was formed by the presidents of at least a dozen chiropractic colleges of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges,[3] and in 2001 the World Federation of Chiropractic, representing the national chiropractic associations in 77 countries, adopted a consensus statement reaffirming belief in the vertebral subluxation.[4]

 

In May 2010 the General Chiropractic Council, the statutory regulatory body for chiropractors in the United Kingdom, issued guidance for chiropractors stating that the chiropractic vertebral subluxation complex "is not supported by any clinical research evidence that would allow claims to be made that it is the cause of disease or health concerns."[5] A similar stance is taken by the National Health Service: "There is also no scientific evidence to support the idea that most illness is caused by misalignment of the spine."[6]

 

The WHO acknowledges this difference between the medical and chiropractic definitions of a subluxation. Medical doctors only refer to "significant structural displacements" as subluxations, whereas chiropractors suggest that a dysfunctional segment, whether displaced significantly or not, should be referred to as a subluxation.[1] This difference has been noted in the proceedings of the Mercy Center Consensus Conference: "The chiropractic profession refers to this concept as a "subluxation". This use of the word subluxation should not be confused with the term's precise anatomic usage which considers only the anatomical relationships."[2]

 

The chiropractic vertebral subluxation complex has been a source of controversy since its inception in 1895 due to its metaphysical origins and claims of far reaching effects on health and disease. Although research into the significance of the chiropractic vertebral subluxation is still ongoing, it has critics and supporters both inside and outside the profession.

 

Although some in the chiropractic profession reject the concept of subluxation and shun the use of this term as a diagnosis,[3] its current and officially accepted status by the profession has been repeatedly confirmed: In 1996 a consensus definition of subluxation was formed by the presidents of at least a dozen chiropractic colleges of the Association of Chiropractic Colleges,[3] and in 2001 the World Federation of Chiropractic, representing the national chiropractic associations in 77 countries, adopted a consensus statement reaffirming belief in the vertebral subluxation.[4]

 

In May 2010 the General Chiropractic Council, the statutory regulatory body for chiropractors in the United Kingdom, issued guidance for chiropractors stating that the chiropractic vertebral subluxation complex "is not supported by any clinical research evidence that would allow claims to be made that it is the cause of disease or health concerns."[5] A similar stance is taken by the National Health Service: "There is also no scientific evidence to support the idea that most illness is caused by misalignment of the spine."[6]

 

Chiropractor in Colorado Springs

As a chiropractor in Colorado Springs, Cathey Chiropractic can treat spinal and vertebral subluxation. Dr. Scott Cathey has been helping patients in Colorado Springs, Colorado his entire career as a chiropractic healthcare provider. Spinal adjustments for lower back pain, neckaches and headaches are a large part of the chiropractic wellness care that Dr. Cathey provides at Cathey Chiropractic.

 

Spinal Degeneration

Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a medical condition in which the spinal canal narrows and compresses the spinal cord and nerves at the level of the lumbar vertebra. This is usually due to the common occurrence of spinal degeneration that occurs with aging. It can also sometimes be caused by spinal disc herniation, osteoporosis or a tumor. In the cervical (neck) and lumbar (low back) region it can be a congenital condition to varying degrees.

 

Spinal stenosis may affect the cervical or thoracic region in which case it is known as cervical spinal stenosis or thoracic spinal stenosis. In some cases, it may be present in all three places in the same patient. Lumbar spinal stenosis results in low back pain as well as pain or abnormal sensations in the legs, thighs, feet or buttocks, or loss of bladder and bowel control.

Chiropractor in Colorado Springs

As a Chiropractor in Colorado Springs, Dr. Scott Cathey of Cathey Chiropractic has diagnosed many patients in various stages of spinal degeneration. Catching spinal degeneration early is beneficial and Dr. Cathey can provide a chriopractic wellness program to reduce the effects of spinal degeneration and help slow the process. Dr. Cathey suggests a healthy diet, exercise, chiropractic treatments for successful treatment in many patients.

 

Accidents Happen - AUTO ACCIDENT QUESTIONS

 

I was in an auto accident - can you help?

Yes!! The most important action to take following a car accident is to get checked out by a physician. Make sure that you are ok. The severity of the accident will usually dictate the necessary immediate actions. The necessity for a trip to the emergency room is usually decided at the schene of the accident.

 

Accidents: What happens to us?

The traumatics of the accident are past and you are home, now what? Many accidents including minor collisions put an enormous amount of stress and strain on our bodies. Fragile areas such as the neck can receive a force of several Gs higher than we are designed to withstand. Our heads weigh about 8 - 10 pounds and when our bodies are suddenly thrust in a new direction from the impact of the collision, our heads usually are the last to abosrb the energy from the impact.  When our bodies move suddenly at the velocity of an impact and our heads follow, the neck is put under a strain which causes whiplash. This can be from an impact in any directiion including rear impact, side impact or frontal collision.

 

What about insurance?

Most drivers have an insurance policy which includes medical. Your deductible does not apply to the medical portion of the policy. We accept most auto policy insurance.

 

How long will it take?

There are many factors involved when determining the length of time required to heal our bodies. Factors such as age, severity of the damage, general health condition prior to the accident, current diet and exercise habits. A person that is young, healthy and active would expect to heal quicker than someone middle aged, poor diet and doesn't exercise. Many minor injuries to the neck or back causing neck pain and lower back pain can be treated effectivelly in a relatively short period of time. The sooner chiropractic treatment is received, the faster the recovery period typically is.

 

Does it hurt?

Many people are already in pain from the auto accident. The last thing they desire is additional pain. Dr. Scott Cathey uses a variety of tools and methods to adjust the problem areas with as little force as necessary. Most patients feel relief from pain minutes after chiropractic adjustments are performed.

 

Chiropractic Treatment Techniques

 

Many chiropractic treatment techniques are available for use by chiropractors.

 

Although the chiropractic profession is primarily based on the use of the spinal adjustment, many other techniques exist for treating the spine, as well as other joints and tissues. A modern chiropractor may specialize in spinal adjustments only, or may use a wide range of methods intended to address an array of neuromusculoskeletal and general health issues. Examples include soft tissue therapy, strength training, dry needling (similar to acupuncture), functional electrical stimulation, traction, and nutritional recommendations.

 

Chiropractors may also use other complementary alternative methods as part of a holistic treatment approach.

 

Overview

spinal_large_series_good

Procedure

 

Diversified technique

Physical fitness/exercise promotion

 

Corrective or therapeutic exercise

 

Ergonomic/postural advice

 

Self-care strategies

 

Activities of daily living

 

Changing risky/unhealthy behaviors

 

Nutritional/dietary recommendations

 

Relaxation/stress reduction recommendations

 

Ice pack/cryotherapy

 

Extremity adjusting

 

Trigger point therapy

 

Disease prevention/early screening advice

% of DCs Using It

 

 

96.2

 

 

98.3

 

 

98.3

 

 

97.3

 

96.6

 

 

96.6

 

 

96.6

 

 

 

97.7

 

 

96.4

 

95.4

 

91.0

 

90.8

% of DCs Using It

 

 

96.2

 

 

98.3

 

 

98.3

 

 

97.3

 

96.6

 

 

96.6

 

 

96.6

 

 

 

97.7

 

 

96.4

 

95.4

 

91.0

 

90.8

Spinal manipulation, which chiropractors call "spinal adjustment" or "chiropractic adjustment", is the most common treatment used in chiropractic care;[1] in the U.S., chiropractors perform over 90% of all manipulative treatments.[2] Spinal manipulation is a passive manual maneuver during which a three-joint complex is taken past the normal physiological range of movement without exceeding the anatomical boundary limit; its defining factor is a dynamic thrust, a sudden force that causes an audible release and attempts to increase a joint's range of motion. More generally, spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) describes techniques where the hands are used to manipulate, massage, mobilize, adjust, stimulate, apply traction to, or otherwise influence the spine and related tissues; in chiropractic care SMT most commonly takes the form of spinal manipulation.[3] The medicinal use of spinal manipulation can be traced back over 3000 years to ancient Chinese writings. Hippocrates, the "father of medicine" used manipulative techniques,[4] as did the ancient Egyptians and many other cultures. A modern re-emphasis on manipulative therapy occurred in the late 19th century in North America with the emergence of the osteopathic medicine and chiropractic medicine.[5] SMT gained mainstream recognition during the 1980s.[6] Chiropractors consider themselves to be expertly qualified providers of spinal adjustment, manipulation and other manual treatments.[7]

 

Manipulation under anesthesia or MUA is a specialized manipulative procedure that typically occurs in hospitals administered under general anesthesia.[8] Typically, it is performed on patients who have failed to respond to other forms of treatment.[9]

Procedures received by more than 1/3 of patients of licensed U.S. chiropractors (2003 survey)[1]

Spinal adjustment

 

"Spinal adjustment" and "chiropractic adjustment" are terms used by chiropractors to describe their approaches to spinal manipulation, as well as some osteopaths, who use the term "adjustment".

 

Claims made for the benefits of spinal adjustments range from temporary, palliative (pain relieving) effects to long term wellness and preventive care. Some claims are controversial, particularly with regard to indications and health benefits. There is debate concerning the safety of some of the procedures used in spinal adjustments, particularly those including upper cervical manipulations.

 

The original spinal adjustment was a variation of a procedure known today as spinal manipulation. This form of treatment has documented use as far back as Hippocrates and the ancient Egyptians and was carried through the ages by families of bonesetters. The modern form of spinal manipulation techniques have characteristic biomechanical features, and are usually associated with an audible "popping" sound. There is strong evidence that this sound is the result of a phenomenon known as cavitation.

 

National Board of Chiropractic Examiners listing of the most frequently used techniques

 

Chiropractors may include any of hundreds of available techniques and methods in their practices. The National Board of Chiropractic Examiners has rated the following as the most frequently used techniques, here listed with percentages of chiropractors who use them and patients who are treated with them as of 2003:[1]

Technique

 

 

1. Diversified technique

2. Extremity manipulating/adjusting

3. Activator Methods

4. Thompson

5. Gonstead

6. Cox Flexion/Distraction

7. Sacro Occipitial Technique [SOT]

8. Manipulative/Adjustive Instruments

9. Cranial

10. Applied Kinesiology

11. NIMMO/Receptor Tonus

12. Logan Basic

13. Palmer upper cervical [HIO] (Hole-in-One)

14. Pierce-Stillwagon

15. Meric

16. Other

% of Chiropractors Using Technique

 

96.2

95.4

69.9

61.3

57.2

56.5

49.6

40.3

38.0

37.6

33.6

26.0

25.7

15.4

15.1

12.5

% of Patients Treated with Technique

 

71.5

46.8

23.9

28.2

26.2

23.5

15.3

15.7

10.3

12.9

13.4

5.2

6.7

5.1

4.3

10.4

WebMD listing of techniques

 

Over the years, many variations of these techniques have been delivered, most as proprietary techniques developed by individual practitioners. WebMD has made a partial list:[10]

  • Activator technique

  • Advanced BioStructural Correction

  • Applied Kinesiology

  • Atlas Orthogonal

  • Auricular

  • Barge Analysis

  • Bio Magnetic

  • Bio-Energetic Synchronization

  • Bio-Geometric Integration

  • Biomechanics

  • Blair

  • Body Restoration Technique

  • Carver Technique

  • Cervical Care

  • Cervical Drop

  • Chiropractic Biophysics

  • Clinical Kinesiology

  • Concept Therapy

  • Contact Reflex Analysis

  • Cox

  • Craniosacral Therapy

  • Directional Non-Force

  • Diversified technique

  • Flexion-Distraction

  • Gonstead

  • Grostic

  • Hole in one [HIO]

  • Kale

  • Leander

  • Logan Basic

  • Manual Adjusting

  • Meric

  • Motion Palpation

  • Network

  • Neural Organization Technique

  • Neuro Emotional Technique

  • Neuro Muscular Technique

  • Neuro Vascular Technique

  • Nimmo

  • Palmer Package

  • Pettibon

  • Pierce

  • Pierce Stillwagon

  • Pro-Adjuster

  • Receptor Tonus

  • Sacral Occipital Technique (SOT)

  • Soft Tissue Orthopedics

  • Spinal Biomechanics

  • Spinal Biomedical Engineering

  • Spinal Biophysics

  • Thompson

  • Thompson Terminal Point

  • Toftness

  • Toggle Recoil

  • Torque Release

  • Total Body Modification

  • Traction

  • Upper Cervical

  • Vector Point Therapy

  • Versendaal

Chiropractor in Colorado Springs

 

Dr. Scott Cathey is a certified chiropractic physician in Colorado Springs. He has dedicated his career to helping patients with auto accident injuries, neck pain, low back pain, sports injuries, hip pain, joint pain. Dr. Cathey is active in the Colorado Springs community and enjoyes the outdoors. His passion is helping his patients enjoy life in a healthy way. Cathey Chiropractic offers chiropractic treatments as well as wellness programs to fit your lifestyle.